TOFU NOODLE SOUP

Tofu noodle soup

The change in seasons often brings about colds and respiratory ailments. This nourishing soup will fend off any unsuspecting bugs at the pass and, sick or not, is the ultimate comfort food to bolster your system.

 

TOFU NOODLE SOUP

Tofu Noodle Soup (Printable Version).pdf

Serves: 2
Preparation: 1 hour including marinating time
Cooking time: 10 minutes

Note : Tofu could be replaced with a firm white fish fillet such as cod, pollock or basa

 

INGREDIENTS

Marinade :
3 cm piece of ginger root, peeled & grated
2 tsp mirin
2 tsp soy sauce
2 tsp fish sauce

Soup :
300 g silken tofu, cut into 2 cm pieces
100 g ramen noodles
500 ml chicken stock
2 tsp fish sauce
2 garlic cloves, minced or finely chopped
1 carrot, julienned
½ cucumber, deseeded & julienned
50 g French beans, trimmed & halved lengthways
salt & white pepper
handful of coriander leaves
toasted sesame seeds (optional)

 

PREPARATION

1. Combine the marinade ingredients in a bowl. Season the tofu with salt and pepper and add to the marinade. Coat thoroughly and set aside to marinade in the fridge for an hour or overnight.

2. Cook the noodles according to the instructions on the packet, drain and refresh under water.

3. Combine the chicken stock with the fish sauce and garlic and bring to the boil.

4. Add the tofu and its marinade, cover and simmer for 2-3 minutes.

5. Add the carrot, cucumber and French beans and simmer for a further 2-3 minutes or until the vegetables are al dente.

6. Divide the noodles between 2 bowls. Pour over the soup and share the vegetables and tofu evenly. Check the seasoning. Serve with a scattering of toasted sesame seeds and coriander.

Up chopsticks and a spoon and slip, slop & slurp your way to better health!

Spotlight ingredient : Garlic


GarlicNative to central Asia, garlic is a member of the allium genus alongside leeks, onions, shallots and chives.  It has been used both medicinally and in food for thousands of years and studies suggest that it may assist in lowering LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) and be a powerful anti-oxidant whilst the allicin that is produced when finely chopping garlic has known antibiotic properties.  Colds be gone!  Sliced and pan-fried or roasted whole, it forms a delicious backdrop to virtually any savoury dish.

 

Photo credits: Earl, Sylvia Fountaine

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